International Conventions, Treaties etc

International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (CESCR)

The International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) is a multilateral treaty adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on December 16, 1966, and in force from January 3, 1976. It commits its parties to work toward the granting of economic, social, and cultural rights (ESCR) to individuals, including labour rights and rights to health, education, and an adequate standard of living. As of December, 2008, the Covenant had 160 parties.[1] A further six countries had signed, but not yet ratified the Covenant. The ICESCR is part of the International Bill of Human Rights, along with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), including the latter's first and second Optional Protocols.

Istanbul Protocol [2022 version]: Manual on the Effective Investigation and Documentation of Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment

 

On 29th June 2022 a revised version of a major human rights document – the Istanbul Protocol – was launched in Geneva. Since 1999, the Istanbul Protocol has set out international standards for investigating and documenting acts of torture and ill-treatment, providing essential guidance for medical, law enforcement, prosecution, judicial and other relevant professionals.  The complete Protocol can be downloaded below.

Madrid Protocol (Protocol Relating to the Madrid Agreement Concerning the International Registration of Marks)

The States party to this Protocol (hereinafter referred to as “the Contracting States”), even where they are not party to the Madrid Agreement Concerning the International Registration of Marks as revised at Stockholm in 1967 and as amended in 1979 (hereinafter referred to as “the Madrid (Stockholm) Agreement”), and the organizations referred to in Article 14(1)(b) which are party to this Protocol (hereinafter referred to as “the Contracting Organizations”) shall be members of the same Union of which countries party to the Madrid (Stockholm) Agreement are member

Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CAT)

Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment
Adopted on 18 December 2002 at the fifty-seventh session of the General Assembly of the United Nations by resolution A/RES/57/199.
Entered into force on 22 June 2006

Robben Island Guidelines

The African Charter on Human and Peoples Rights establishes a regional human rights body, the African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights, with the mandate to promote the observance of the Charter, ensure the protection of the rights and freedoms set out in the Charter, interpret the Charter and advise on its implementation. Article 5 of the African Charter provides that every individual shall have the right to the respect of the dignity inherent in a human being and to the recognition of his legal status.

Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, aiming at the abolition of the death penalty (CCPR-OP2)

The States Parties to the present Protocol,
Believing that abolition of the death penalty contributes to enhancement of human dignity and
progressive development of human rights,
Recalling article 3 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted on 10 December
1948, and article 6 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, adopted on 16
December 1966,
Noting that article 6 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights refers to

Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Preamble
Whereas
recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world,  
Whereas disregard and contempt for human rights have resulted in barbarous acts which have outraged the conscience of mankind, and the advent of a world in which human beings shall enjoy freedom of speech and belief and freedom from fear and want has been proclaimed as the highest aspiration of the common people,  

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